2500000TREES PLANTED

Special Effects Camera Filters

Urth effect filters revolutionised lens filters for photographers and filmmakers. Our effect filters are consciously curated to maximise creative possibilities.

Urth effect filters revolutionised lens filters for photographers and filmmakers. Our effect filters are consciously curated to maximise creative possibilities.

Read more Read less

Urth effect filters revolutionised lens filters for photographers and filmmakers. Our effect ... Read more Read less

4 items

4.4
The Stellar Filter Kit

Starburst options

From $52+

Add to cart Buy Now
4.9
Night Filter Plus+

Elevated night photography

From $53+

Add to cart Buy Now
4.6
Infrared Filter Plus+

Stunning infrared photography

From $43+

Add to cart Buy Now
5.0
Night Square Filter Plus+

Elevated night photography

From $99+

Add to cart Buy Now

“Wow. Never expected the creative wave this caused to ripple through my photography. A whole new way of looking at the world.” – Wilhelm bought our Infrared Plus+.

Sorry there are no products found. Clear filters

Urth effect filters revolutionised lens filters for photographers and filmmakers. Our effect filters are consciously curated to maximise creative possibilities. Read more Read less

Urth effect filters revolutionised lens filters for photographers and filmmakers. Our effect ... Read more Read less

Urth effect filters revolutionised lens filters for photographers and filmmakers. Our effect filters are consciously curated to maximise creative possibilities. Read more Read less

How do I find the right lens mount adapter?

Find your lens mount and your camera mount.

Identifying your lens mount

The easiest way to find and confirm your lens mount is to know the mount of the camera it was used on originally. A quick internet search of the camera model followed by lens mount is a sure way to confirm what lens mount you need. For example if you have an old Nikon lens and you know it was used on a Nikon FM2, you can easily find that the lens has a Nikon F-mount. This is particularly useful for lenses that are made for different mounts i.e Sigma and Tamron bring out the same lens with different mounts including EF, F, E so knowing the camera the lens was used on is a good shortcut.

If you have an old second hand lens and you are unsure of the camera it was made for, take all the known details of the lens and search the web.

Identifying your camera mount

A quick internet search of the camera model followed by lens mount is the quickest way to confirm your camera’s lens mount. E.g. If you have a Sony A7r, a quick search shows it has a Sony E-mount.

My camera won't take a photo with an adapter, what do I do?

Try changing your camera settings to ‘shoot without lens’.

Our lens adapters are fully manual, and therefore you need to manually set all electronic functions on your lens and camera. If your camera won’t take a photo, it’s probably because your camera can’t sense a lens attached, that’s why you need to set it to ‘shoot without lens’. Ensure all settings on your lens and camera are put into manual mode too.

How do I change my aperture with the lens adapter on?

Manually set your aperture.

If your lens has an aperture ring, use that to set the aperture, and if your lens doesn’t you’ll need to set it manually through your camera settings.

How do I find what mount my lens and camera take?

Find your lens mount and your camera mount.

Identifying your lens mount

The easiest way to find and confirm your lens mount is to know the mount of the camera it was used on originally. A quick internet search of the camera model followed by lens mount is a sure way to confirm what lens mount you need. For example if you have an old Nikon lens and you know it was used on a Nikon FM2, you can easily find that the lens has a Nikon F-mount. This is particularly useful for lenses that are made for different mounts i.e Sigma and Tamron bring out the same lens with different mounts including EF, F, E so knowing the camera the lens was used on is a good shortcut.

If you have an old second hand lens and you are unsure of the camera it was made for, take all the known details of the lens and search the web.

Identifying your camera mount

A quick internet search of the camera model followed by lens mount is the quickest way to confirm your camera’s lens mount. E.g. If you have a Sony A7r, a quick search shows it has a Sony E-mount.

Why do my photos have a thick black band when using my adapter?

Most likely because you’re using a crop sensor (APS-C) lens on a full frame camera, which causes vignetting or a black border around your image.

The black border effect isn’t an issue with your lens adapter, it’s because the size of the lens is designed for a smaller camera sensor. So when you use the APS-C lens with a full frame camera sensor, there is a border around the outside where light from the lens cannot reach. This appears as a black band in the image. 

Here is an analogy to help you think of this in a different way: Imagine your APS-C lens is a 6x8 photograph and you want to frame it. Your full sensor camera is like a 10x12 picture frame. If you want to use this frame for that photo, there’s going to be some blank space around it

To avoid this happening, you can use crop sensor lenses with crop sensor cameras, and use full frame sensor lenses with crop sensor cameras although the image will be cropped by the size of your camera sensor.

@URTH Follow Us

Your Cart (0)

You're $0.00 away from free shipping!

Free shipping for all Australian customers!

Your cart is currently empty.

You might also like

Glass Cleaning Spray

Glass Cleaning Spray 100ml / 3.38 fl. oz.

Our formula is free from alcohol or ammonia so it’s